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Home > Promotions and competitions > Lotteries, raffles and games of chance

Lotteries, raffles and games of chance

Page last updated:
Monday, October 27, 2014

Lotteries, raffles and games of chance may be used by businesses to promote a particular product or service, to raise money for non-profit organisations or by registered clubs to increase membership.

You must comply with the requirements of the Lotteries and Art Unions Act 1901. If a lottery is conducted to raise money for a charity, an authority under the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 may be required. A non-profit organisation is defined as a body of persons which is not formed for private gain, and includes charities, social clubs, registered clubs, political parties and trade unions.

This page contains quick facts on the various types of lotteries and a link to the fact sheet outlining the rules and regulations that apply. Permits may apply for selected lotteries and an application fee may also apply.

Quick links

Art Unions | Card Jackpot Games | Charity Housie | Chocolate Wheels | Club Bingo | Football Doubles | Gaming Nights | Gratuitous Lotteries | Guessing Competitions | Hundreds Clubs | Lotto-style lotteries | Lucky Envelopes | Mini-numbers | No-draw lotteries | Progressive lotteries | Promotional Raffles | Raffles | Silver Circles | Social Housie | Sweeps/calcuttas | Tipping competitions | Trade promotions |

Art unions

Read more about art union lotteries.

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Card jackpot games

Read more about card jackpot games and card jackpot games and other similar games guidelines.

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Charity Housie

Read more about Charity Housie lotteries.

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Chocolate wheels

Read more about chocolate wheels lotteries.

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Club bingo

Read more about club bingo lotteries.

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Football doubles

Read more about football doubles lotteries.

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Gaming nights

Read more about gaming nights.

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Gratuitous lotteries (also known as ‘lucky door?or ‘lucky seat?promotions)

Read more about gratuitous lotteries.

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Guessing competitions (refer to Raffles)

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Hundred clubs (refer Progressive lotteries)

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Lotto-style lotteries (refer No-draw lotteries)

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Lucky envelopes

Read more about lucky envelopes.

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Mini-numbers

Read more about mini-number lotteries.

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No-draw lotteries

Read more about no-draw lotteries.

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Progressive Lotteries

Progressive lotteries are lotteries or games of chance in which a number of draws may be conducted on various dates over a stipulated period of time. The most common types of progressive lotteries are 'hundred clubs' and 'silver circles'.

Read more about progressive lotteries.

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Promotional raffles

Read more about promotional raffles. For more information on raffles, see below.

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Raffles

Read more about raffles.

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Silver Circles (refer Progressive lotteries)

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Social Housie

Read more about social housie.

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Sweeps/Calcuttas

Read more about sweeps or calcutta lotteries.

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Tipping Competitions

Read more about tipping competitions and tipping competition helpful hints.

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Trade promotions

Read more about trade promotions.

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Further information

Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 -outlines the requirements when a lottery or game of chance is used to raise money for a charity.

Conduct of interstate lotteries -gives guidance to persons and organisations wanting to further the conduct of an interstate-based lottery in New South Wales.

Prohibited prizes or prizes subject to restrictions -lotteries and games of chance may also have specific restrictions. Refer to the Money prizes - prohibited prizes fact sheet or individual fact sheets.

Ready reference (PDF 312kb) - Summary of the various types of lotteries and games of chance that may be conducted.

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